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    Silent Killer Hidden in Your Kitchen Pantry: MSG

    mudra
    mudra

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    Post  mudra on Sat Sep 05, 2015 8:24 am


    Silent Killer Hidden in Your Kitchen Pantry: MSG


    The danger that lies in MSG is almost impossible to avoid. The chemical flavor enhancer has been linked to a plethora of health issues including: fibromyalgia, obesity, fatty liver, high insulin and blood sugar, metabolic syndrome, neurological and brain damage.



    Monosodium glutamate (MSG), is a flavor enhancer that’s known widely as an addition to Chinese food but as it turns out MSG is added to thousands of the foods you and your family regularly eat.



    MSG is one of the worst food additives on the market. It’s used in everything from canned soups, crackers, meats, and salad dressings, to baby food, infant formula, and your child’s school lunch.



    MSG is NOT simply a seasoning like salt or pepper. It literally enhances flavors, preventing processed meats and frozen dinners from showing you their true characteristics. This chemical makes them taste fresher, smell better, it makes salad dressings more tasty, and canned foods less tinny.



    It’s obvious why this would be highly profitable for big box food corporations that care solely about making money, but is MSG silently doing major harm to your health?



    It is a common misconception that MSG has a flavor or is a meat tenderizer. The way MSG works is by tricking your senses into thinking your food contains more protein and tastes better. There’s a little known fifth taste called umami. Umami recognizes the savory flavor of glutamate which is found in bacon, and of course synthetically found in MSG. In a nutshell, MSG tricks your brain into thinking you’re eating something as savory as bacon. No wonder it’s so addictive.



    Ajinomoto, the world’s largest producer of MSG, is interestingly also a drug manufacturer. MSG didn’t become widespread in the United States until after World War II, when the U.S. military discovered that Japanese rations were much tastier than the U.S. versions.



    In 1959, the U.S. FDA declared MSG was “Generally Recognized as Safe” (GRAS). MSG has remained listed as GRAS just as many other FDA approved ingredients that are banned in other countries due to health risks. 10 years after its introduction into the American food supply a condition known as “Chinese Restaurant Syndrome” became common in medical literature. Chinese Restaurant Syndrome was used to describe the numerous side-effects, from numbness to heart palpitations, that people experienced after eating MSG.



    Today Chinese Restaurant Syndrome has been more appropriately renamed, “MSG Symptom Complex,” which the FDA is well aware of and identifies as a “short-term reaction” to MSG. Despite this admission and acceptance the FDA still “generally recognizes it as safe.”



    Dr. Russell Blaylock, a board-certified neurosurgeon and author of “Excitotoxins: The Taste that Kills.” explains that MSG causes brain damage to varying degrees — and even triggers or worsens learning disabilities, Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, Lou Gehrig’s disease and more.


    Part of the problem is that MSG is approximately 78% free glutamic acid. Free glutamic acid is the same neurotransmitter used by your brain, nervous system, eyes, pancreas and more, to initiate processes in your body. Even the FDA admits:

    “Studies have shown that the body uses glutamate, an amino acid, as a nerve impulse transmitter in the brain and that there are glutamate-responsive tissues in other parts of the body, as well.

    Abnormal function of glutamate receptors has been linked with certain neurological diseases, such as Alzheimer’s disease and Huntington’s chorea. Injections of glutamate in laboratory animals have resulted in damage to nerve cells in the brain.”


    Dr. Blaylock points out that numerous glutamate receptors have been found both within your heart’s electrical conduction system and the heart muscle itself. This could explain the sudden deaths seen among young athletes and should serve as a huge warning to anyone who consumes MSG.

    read on: http://www.realfarmacy.com/silent-killer-hidden-kitchen-pantry-msg/

    Love Always
    mudra
    Pris
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    Post  Pris on Thu Jul 21, 2016 6:28 pm

    ...


    Last edited by Pris on Sat Jul 15, 2017 5:08 pm; edited 1 time in total
    Swanny
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    Post  Swanny on Fri Jul 22, 2016 4:52 am

    Soy sauce is bad news. It's made from soya beans which are really bad for you.
    Like soya milk. My ex actually thinks soya milk is good for her confused
    Pris
    Pris

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    Post  Pris on Fri Jul 22, 2016 5:56 am

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    Yeah... I know, Swanny.  Sigh.

    For starters, soy is bad for the thyroid and helps grow man-boobs...

    For a plant, it's got an interesting defense mechanism:  turn your eaters all into the same sex so they can't reproduce so there will be less of them to eat you. Crazy Happy

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    mudra
    mudra

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    Post  mudra on Fri Jul 22, 2016 1:34 pm

    Regarding the harmful effects of Soja the following article is an interesting read :

    Arrow https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2010/jul/01/anti-soya-brigade-ignore-scaremongering

    If you look carefully, most anti-soya stories can be traced back to one single group in the US called the Weston A Price Foundation (WAPF).  WAPF claims to be dedicated to promoting good nutrition by restoring nutrient-dense animal products to the diet – particularly unpasteurised "raw" whole milk. It claims that saturated animal fat is essential for good health and that animal fat intake and high cholesterol levels have no link with heart disease or cancer. They say that vegetarians have lower life expectancy than meat-eaters, and that historically humans have always eaten large amounts of animal fat. All this, of course, contradicts all the leading health advisory bodies in the world, including the World Health Organisation, American Dietetic Association and the British Medical Association. wrote:

    Love from me
    mudra
    mudra
    mudra

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    Post  mudra on Fri Jul 22, 2016 2:45 pm

    Over the years as far I am concerned I have experienced that the best tasty diet I have ever been on was plain raw high quality food.
    No flavours of any sort added at all . It becomes completely unecessary. That's when I felt physically at the top.
    Not so practical though in our modern time social life specially when invited to share a meal with people.

    Love from me
    mudra

    Pris
    Pris

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    Post  Pris on Fri Jul 22, 2016 7:35 pm

    mudra wrote:Regarding the harmful effects of Soja the following article is an interesting read :

    Arrow https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2010/jul/01/anti-soya-brigade-ignore-scaremongering



    Love from me
    mudra


    LOL yes, that was an interesting read. Wink Thanks, mudra. Good grief, eh?
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    Pris
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    Post  Pris on Fri Jul 22, 2016 8:03 pm

    mudra wrote:Over the years as far I am concerned I have experienced that the best tasty diet I have ever been on was plain raw high quality food.
    No flavours of any sort added at all . It becomes completely unecessary. That's when I felt physically at the top.
    Not so practical though in our modern time social life specially when invited to share a meal with people.

    Love from me
    mudra



    Me, too.  More lately for me, I'm enjoying raw food.  Even sprinkling a few spices on top isn't really necessary... depends on how I feel.  And, I don't use salt and almost never any pepper.

    I've been eating tofu every once in awhile but I think I'll switch to some fermented kind from now on after re-visiting this subject.  Hypothyroidism is something I've dealt with and I'm very aware of the 'ups' and 'downs' of my metabolism (also why I avoid things like broccoli and cauliflower).  I don't take 'medication' anymore and have been using alternative healing modalities.



    Fermented Soy is Only Soy Food Fit for Human Consumption
    Barbara L. Minton

    The key to releasing the nutrients of the soybean has been known for thousands of years

    About 1000 B.C. some smart person in China discovered that a mold, when allowed to grow on soybeans, destroyed the toxins present and made the nutrients in the beans available to the body. This process became known as fermentation and led to the creation of the still popular foods tempeh, miso, and natto.

    A few centuries later, a simpler process was developed to prepare soybeans for consumption. After lengthy soaking and cooking, the beans were treated with nigari, a substance found in seawater. The end product was tofu. During the Ming dynasty, fermented soy appeared in the Chinese Materia Medica as a nutritionally important food and an effective remedy for diseases.

    Unfermented soybeans contain potent anti-nutrients

    In their natural form, soybeans contain phytochemicals with toxic effects on the human body. The three major anti-nutrients are phytates, enzyme inhibitors and goitrogens.

    These anti-nutrients are the way nature protects the soybean plant so that it can live long enough to effectively reproduce. They function as the immune system of the plant, offering protection from the radiation of the sun, and from invasion by bacteria, viruses, or fungi. They make the soybean plant unappetizing to foraging animals. All plants have some anti-nutrient properties, but the soybean plant is especially rich in these chemicals. If they are not removed by extensive preparation such as fermentation or soaking, soybeans are one of the worst foods a person can eat.

    Unfermented soy has been linked to digestive distress, immune system breakdown, PMS, endometriosis, reproductive problems for men and women, allergies, ADD and ADHD, higher risk of heart disease and cancer, malnutrition, and loss of libido.

    Groups most at risk of experiencing negative effects from the anti-nutrient properties of soy are infants taking soy baby formula, vegetarians eating a high soy diet, and mid-life women going heavy on the soy foods thinking they will help with symptoms of menopause.

    Soybeans contain high levels of phytates

    All legumes contain phytate (also known as phytic acid) to some extent, but the soybean is particularly rich in this anti-nutrient. Phytate works in the gastrointestinal tract to tightly bind minerals such as zinc, copper, iron, magnesium and calcium. It has a particularly strong affinity for zinc, a mineral that supports wound healing, protein synthesis, reproductive health, nerve function, and brain development. It is believed that people living in developing countries are shorter than those in developed countries because of zinc deficiency caused by eating too many legumes. There is also evidence that mental development can be negatively impacted by a diet high in phytate.

    In most legumes such as other varieties of beans, soaking is enough to break down most of the phytate content. However the soybean requires that the enzymes be released in the fermentation process to reduce its phytate content to the point where it becomes fit for consumption. This means that fermented soy foods like miso and tempeh have the lowest levels of phytate and are the best choices for anyone wishing to eat soybean products. Tofu is also a good choice, as long as care is taken to replenish loss nutrients.

    Whole soybeans, soy milk, soy chips, soy protein isolates, soy flour and all the other myriad of products made from processed soybeans and advertised as health foods have much higher levels of phytate and are not worth eating.

    Unfermented soy products are rich in enzyme inhibitors

    When food is eaten, digestive enzymes such as amylase lipase and protease are secreted into the digestive tract to help break it down and free nutrients for assimilation into the body. The high content of enzyme inhibitors in unfermented soybeans interferes with this process and makes carbohydrates and proteins from soybeans impossible to completely digest. When foods are not completely digested because of enzyme inhibitors, bacteria in the large intestine try to do the job, and this can cause discomfort, bloating, and embarrassment. Anyone with naturally low levels of digestive enzymes such as elderly people would suffer the most from the enzyme inhibiting action of soy.

    Soybeans can block production of thyroid hormone

    Soybeans have a high content of goitrogens, substances that can block the production of thyroid hormone as well as cause goiter formation. Low thyroid activity plagues women in America, particularly middle-aged women. Thyroid hormone stokes the cellular furnaces, known as mitochrondia. When thyroid production is low, energy levels as well as body heat are also low. Low thyroid level is what makes old people move so slowly and seem like every action is a huge chore. Low thyroid means the action of the heart is reduced, resulting in lack of oxygen to the cells, a prime condition for cancer.

    Genistein, an isoflavone found in soybeans, can also block thyroid production. Phytate can accentuate these effects because it binds up zinc and copper, leaving little of these important minerals available to make thyroid hormone.

    A transport protein called GLUT1 is shut down by genistein. This protein sends glucose into the cells where it is used to generate energy. Slowing the transport of glucose means less energy production not only of thyroid hormone, but of every other action in the body.

    Another way in which soy isoflavones reduce energy in the body is by inhibiting tyrosine kinases, enzymes involved in the transfer of energy from one molecule to another. These enzymes drive cell division, memory consolidation, tissue repair, and blood vessel maintenance and regeneration.

    It is this action of regulating cell division that made genistein a popular substance for fighting cancer. When research on this anti-cancer effect of genistein became know, the soy industry feverishly developed products that would appeal to Western women looking for genistein. In the middle of all this excitement, little attention was paid to how the energy reducing effects of genistein lowered cellular energy in normal cells.

    The benefits of genistein come at a high cost

    Women have been encouraged to use high genistein soy products to alleviate symptoms of menopause and as a guard against bone loss and breast cancer. But given the full range of effects of genistein in the body, high consumption could result in age-related memory loss. Commercial soybean products offer genistein levels as high as 20 to 60 mg per serving. Asians are presented as an example of the benefits of eating soybean products because their incidence of breast cancer and osteoporosis is low. However, the Asian diet of fermented soybean products such as miso and tempeh includes only around 5 mg of genistein a day.

    Genistein slows the growth of blood vessels to tumors, another action that makes it popular as a cancer fighter. However, it has the same effect on blood vessels serving normal cells. Eating a regular diet high in genistein could result in the starvation of healthy blood vessels, resulting in a reduced supply of oxygen to cells, setting up a cancer promoting situation.

    In a graphic example of how genistein slows cellular energy, a study found that eating high levels of it slowed hair growth by 60 to 80 percent

    A decade ago a study of 8,000 Asian men showed that those consuming the highest amounts of tofu had smaller brain size and nearly three times the rate of senile dementia as those who ate the lowest amounts. These results suggest that eating foods high in isoflavones such as soy protein isolates may accelerate the aging of the brain.

    Fermentation releases nutrients and transforms soybeans into nutritious food

    People filling up their shopping carts with raw or cooked soybeans, soy milk, and other non-fermented soybean products do not realize that the isoflavones they contain will not be available to their bodies. Most of the isoflavones in soy products are bound to carbohydrate molecules called glucosides. In this form genistein is actually called genistin. It is fermentation that transforms genistin into genistein. Many products in the U.S. do not distinguish between genistin and genistein on their labels.

    Even with fermented soy foods, a little goes a long way. The nutrients found in miso, tempeh, and natto can be beneficial in the moderate amounts found in the typical Asian diet, but have the potential to do harm in higher amounts. In China and Japan, about an ounce of fermented soy food is eaten on a daily basis.

    When fermented soy foods are used in small amounts they help build the inner ecosystem, providing a wealth of friendly microflora to the intestinal tract that can help with digestion and assimilation of nutrients, and boost immunity.

    Dr. John Lee, author of several books on the health of women, recommended that women wishing to consume soy production eat only miso, tempeh, natto. Tofu can also be eaten provided it is accompanied by fish or some other protein source and some seaweed or kelp to replenish bound minerals. Eating small amounts of these foods will provide the cancer protective effects of genistein without causing the other potential problems of genistein. Dr. Lee recommended avoiding genistein and isoflavone supplements, and soy protein isolates.

    For entire article:
    http://www.naturalnews.com/025513_soy_food_soybeans.html
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