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    Stories for reflection

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    mudra

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    Re: Stories for reflection

    Post  mudra on Sun Jan 04, 2015 2:11 pm


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    Re: Stories for reflection

    Post  mudra on Thu Jan 15, 2015 4:23 pm

    This Guy Left Wall Street To Open A ‘Pay It Forward’ Pizza Shop. It Now Feeds 40 Homeless A Day.


    Mason left his job at Wall Street as an equity researcher to start up Rosa’s Fresh Pizza — a pizza business named after his mother — in Philadelphia.

    Mason sells a slice of pizza for $1 in his restaurant


    His customer’s can pay it forward by buying a slice for someone else


    Every time someone pays it forward, Mason places a ‘post-it’ on the wall


    Whenever someone hungry comes in – they can just grab a post it off the wall to pay for their meal.
    Mason says the idea came to him after one customer wanted to buy a slice for someone in need. After just a few months in business, the store has now transformed into a ‘pay it forward’ sensation. His restaurant now feeds around 40 homeless people a day.
    This man is a true inspiration. As one very thankful person wrote, “God bless you. Because of you I ate off this plate, the only thing I ate all day.”

    source: http://pulptastic.com/guy-left-wall-street-open-pay-forward-pizza-shop-now-feeds-40-homeless-day/?utm_content=buffer30e92&utm_medium=social&utm_source=facebook.com&utm_campaign=buffer

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    A different kind of dough

    Post  B.B.Baghor on Fri Jan 16, 2015 4:31 am


    Goddess Maat, measurer of what's been true in our life.

    Thank you for sharing this initiative, mudra I love you This guy stands in front of his "post it" wall, with arms and hands, clearly
    showing he's a working craftsman now. With the brightest smile on Earth. No use of handcraft, nor smiles, at Wall Street, for the money
    has become invisible, hasn't it? No need for counting the bills, using his hands. Or giving it away. Only a bubble which never makes any
    person happy. Now he's working with a different kind of dough, making homeless people and their tummy happy. There are angels among
    us for sure. With dough on their hands and flour on their arms.



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    Re: Stories for reflection

    Post  mudra on Sat Jan 24, 2015 1:25 pm


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    Re: Stories for reflection

    Post  mudra on Thu Feb 05, 2015 7:03 am

    Richard Turere : My invention that made peace with lions

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RAoo--SeUIk



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    The Messiah conquers The White House by Aying Godman

    Post  B.B.Baghor on Thu Feb 05, 2015 7:24 pm

    Here's a link to a review of an unusual book, explaining the role of president Barack Obama. Against a religious background.
    Since his election, in 2008, I feel, despite all that has happened, that this man can be trusted, once he steps into his power.
    Lately, I've found reports online, on his evolving role, stepping into that power, by releasing a mindcontrol program, ruling
    him since childbirth.

    I've got no idea how you will perceive these views and preview of this book, or if and how you value its content, but I'm intri-
    gued by it myself and will delve into it more, in the days to come. In Obama's book, dedicated to his father, I think the title is
    "The dream of my father" I found a fierce determination and action against injustice and abuse of power. I'm a fan.
    Your views and comments are welcome!

    http://books.google.nl/books?id=eTa-AQAAQBAJ&hl=nl&source=gbs_navlinks_s

    About the book:

    "On November 4, 2008, Barack Hussein Obama, a senator from the state of Illinois, was elected to the White House as the forty-fourth president of the United States. This momentous event overwhelmed America and took the whole world by surprise. Although he had led his opponent, Senator John McCain, throughout the period preceding the election in the opinion polls, no one really believed that the timing was right for an African American president of the United States.

    In The Messiah Conquers the White House, author Aying Godman combines scripture, biography, politics, and numerology to explain the historic victory of Barack Obama and to reveal his messianic mission to the White House. An eminent biblical scholar, mystic, and numerologist, Godman predicted the reelection of President Barack Obama in 2012--and it happened, in spite of a steep political opposition and an unfavorable economic backdrop. This study also examines the impact and significance of Obama's victories and concludes with a projection of what the world will be like after he leaves office.

    The Messiah Conquers the White House uncovers the sacred weapons that Barack Obama uses as he fights, conquers, and exercises power in the White House. This evidence demonstrates the power of numbers and the Holy Scriptures in the ongoing victories of Barack Obama."
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    Re: Stories for reflection

    Post  mudra on Fri Feb 27, 2015 11:05 am

    The girl who gets gifts from birds
    By Katy Sewall




    Lots of people love the birds in their garden, but it's rare for that affection to be reciprocated. One young girl in Seattle is luckier than most. She feeds the crows in her garden - and they bring her gifts in return.
    Eight-year-old Gabi Mann sets a bead storage container on the dining room table, and clicks the lid open. This is her most precious collection.

    "You may take a few close looks," she says, "but don't touch." It's a warning she's most likely practised on her younger brother. She laughs after saying it though. She is happy for the audience.
    Inside the box are rows of small objects in clear plastic bags. One label reads: "Black table by feeder. 2:30 p.m. 09 Nov 2014." Inside is a broken light bulb. Another bag contains small pieces of brown glass worn smooth by the sea. "Beer coloured glass," as Gabi describes it.

    Each item is individually wrapped and categorised. Gabi pulls a black zip out of a labelled bag and holds it up. "We keep it in as good condition as we can," she says, before explaining this object is one of her favourites.

    There's a miniature silver ball, a black button, a blue paper clip, a yellow bead, a faded black piece of foam, a blue Lego piece, and the list goes on. Many of them are scuffed and dirty. It is an odd assortment of objects for a little girl to treasure, but to Gabi these things are more valuable than gold.



    Read on: http://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-31604026

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    Re: Stories for reflection

    Post  mudra on Wed Aug 05, 2015 6:34 am



    This photograph is touching hearts around the world. Instead of a having a private banquet, newly married couple Fethullah Üzümcüoğlu and Esra Polat, along with their wedding guests, provided food to 4,000 refugees from Syria in the Turkish border town of Kilis.The idea came from Fethullah's father, and those attending were so inspired by this they are planning similar events at their own weddings. Solidarity is a verb, and it's contagious.

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    Re: Stories for reflection

    Post  mudra on Thu Aug 27, 2015 3:09 pm

    Pavi Metha : The compassionate company

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=65TLzg7GShw


    Pavi Mehta - Centifolia 2013

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p_QLGvp_stI&app=desktop


    An inspiring talk of Pavi Mehta about a new way to do business, to interrelate with one another through compassion, selfishless and love.
    A story about all common rules being broken giving rise to new values.

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    Re: Stories for reflection

    Post  mudra on Mon Sep 14, 2015 5:24 am

    Worth it then

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sFt7hk-L7NM


    Lyrics: verse one: -

    when the fish all die and the lakes catch fire, will it be worth it then
    when the cancer rate's 90 percent or higher, will it be worth it then
    when the whole world's at war over water and oil, will it be worth it then
    when there's no more fighting, because there's no more spoils, will it be worth it then

    chorus:

    what will it take to make you change your mind
    what kind of sign could convince you that people are worth more than you can get from them
    what has to happen before you embrace your part
    will it be too late to fix all the problems you promised the market would sort out economic growth won't save us
    cost analysis won't save us
    voluntary rules won't save us
    rich economists won't save us

    verse two: -

    when the glaciers are gone and the oceans are too strong, will it be worth it then when the deserts spread faster than we can run, will it be worth it then
    when the wind and the skies become our greatest threat, will it be worth it then when military might won't pay our debt, will it be worth it then

    chorus:

    what will it take to make you change your mind
    what kind of sign could convince you that people are worth more than you can get from them
    what has to happen before you embrace your part
    will it be too late to fix all the problems you promised the market would sort out investigations won't save us
    well funded think tanks won't save us hearings and conferences won't save us only action now can save us

    bridge:

    is there something left is there something left is there something left of you if so if so...

    chorus:

    what will it take to make you change your mind
    what kind of sign could convince you that people are worth more than you can get from them
    what has to happen before you embrace your part
    will it be too late to fix all the problems you promised the market would sort out superpower status won't save us
    military minds won't save us all the guns in the world won't save us
    only all of us can save us

    Worth It Then (Benjamin Orth rEMIX)
    Melody and Lyrics: Lonnie Ray Atkinson
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    Re: Stories for reflection

    Post  mudra on Wed Dec 23, 2015 6:50 am

    Iranians spontaneously create 'walls of kindness' to help the homeless

    Faced with cold weather and a troubled economic situation, Iranians are organising spontaneous outdoor charity drives.

    But the "walls of kindness" appearing in major Iranian cities have also generated a debate online about efforts to help the poor.

    The idea seems to have started in the north-eastern city of Mashhad, where someone installed a few hooks and hangers on a wall, next to the words: "If you don't need it, leave it. If you need it, take it." Donations of coats, trousers and other warm clothing started to appear.

    The person who initially set up what came to be known as the "wall of kindness" wishes to remain anonymous, according to a local newspaper. But the idea quickly spread to other cities, fuelled by thousands of Iranians on social media.

    Arrow http://www.bbc.com/news/blogs-trending-35132157



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    Re: Stories for reflection

    Post  mudra on Fri Jan 29, 2016 12:33 pm

    Mister Rogers TV Hall of Fame (Special Appearance by Jeff Erlanger) (1999)

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PI_9GegVoYk


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    Re: Stories for reflection

    Post  mudra on Mon May 09, 2016 12:59 pm

    What it Really Means to Hold Space for Someone



    How to be there for the people who need you most

    When my Mom was dying, my siblings and I gathered to be with her in her final days. None of us knew anything about supporting someone in her transition out of this life into the next, but we were pretty sure we wanted to keep her at home, so we did.

    While we supported Mom, we were, in turn, supported by a gifted palliative care nurse, Ann, who came every few days to care for Mom and to talk to us about what we could expect in the coming days. She taught us how to inject Mom with morphine when she became restless, she offered to do the difficult tasks (like giving Mom a bath), and she gave us only as much information as we needed about what to do with Mom’s body after her spirit had passed.
    Alt text hereThe author with her mother

    “Take your time,” she said. “You don’t need to call the funeral home until you’re ready. Gather the people who will want to say their final farewells. Sit with your mom as long as you need to. When you’re ready, call and they will come to pick her up.”

    Ann gave us an incredible gift in those final days. Though it was an excruciating week, we knew that we were being held by someone who was only a phone call away.

    In the two years since then, I’ve often thought about Ann and the important role she played in our lives. She was much more than what can fit in the title of “palliative care nurse”. She was facilitator, coach, and guide. By offering gentle, nonjudgmental support and guidance, she helped us walk one of the most difficult journeys of our lives.

    The work that Ann did can be defined by a term that’s become common in some of the circles in which I work. She was holding space for us.
    Alt text hereLearning to hold space for others
    What does it mean to “hold space” for someone else?

    It means that we are willing to walk alongside another person in whatever journey they’re on without judging them, making them feel inadequate, trying to fix them, or trying to impact the outcome. When we hold space for other people, we open our hearts, offer unconditional support, and let go of judgement and control.

    Sometimes we find ourselves holding space for people while they hold space for others. In our situation, for example, Ann was holding space for us while we held space for Mom. Though I know nothing about her support system, I suspect that there are others holding space for Ann as she does this challenging and meaningful work. It’s virtually impossible to be a strong space holder unless we have others who will hold space for us. Even the strongest leaders, coaches, nurses, etc., need to know that there are some people with whom they can be vulnerable and weak without fear of being judged.
    Alt text hereUnderstanding the essence of holding space for others

    In my own roles as teacher, facilitator, coach, mother, wife, and friend, etc., I do my best to hold space for other people in the same way that Ann modeled it for me and my siblings. It’s not always easy, because I have a very human tendency to want to fix people, give them advice, or judge them for not being further along the path than they are, but I keep trying because I know that it’s important. At the same time, there are people in my life that I trust to hold space for me.

    To truly support people in their own growth, transformation, grief, etc., we can’t do it by taking their power away (ie. trying to fix their problems), shaming them (ie. implying that they should know more than they do), or overwhelming them (ie. giving them more information than they’re ready for). We have to be prepared to step to the side so that they can make their own choices, offer them unconditional love and support, give gentle guidance when it’s needed, and make them feel safe even when they make mistakes.

    read on: Arrow http://upliftconnect.com/hold-space/

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    Re: Stories for reflection

    Post  mudra on Sun May 22, 2016 3:08 pm

    256 Years Old Man Breaks The Silence Before His Death And Reveals SHOCKING Secrets To The World

    What is the longest a person has ever lived for? Meet Li Ching Yuen, a man who lived an astonishing 256 years! And no, this is not a myth or a fictional tale.

    According to a 1930 New York Times article, Wu Chung-chieh, a professor of the Chengdu University, discovered Imperial Chinese government records from 1827 congratulating Li Ching-Yuen on his 150th birthday, and further documents later congratulating him on his 200th birthday in 1877. In 1928, a New York Times correspondent wrote that many of the old men in Li’s neighborhood asserted that their grandfathers knew him when they were boys, and that he at that time was a grown man.

    Li Ching Yuen reportedly began his herbalist career at the age of 10, where he gathered herbs in mountain ranges and learned of their potency for longevity. For almost 40 years, he survived on a diet of herbs such as lingzhi, goji berry, wild ginseng, he shoo wu and gotu kola and rice wine. In 1749, at the age of 71, he joined the Chinese armies as teacher of martial arts. Li was said to be a much-loved figure in his community, marrying 23 times and fathering over 200 children.

    According to the generally accepted tales told in his province, Li was able to read and write as a child, and by his tenth birthday had traveled in Kansu, Shansi, Tibet, Annam, Siam and Manchuria gathering herbs. For the first hundred years he continued at this occupation. Then he switched to selling herbs gathered by others. He sold lingzhi, goji berry, wild ginseng, he shou wu and gotu kola along with other Chinese herbs, and lived off a diet of these herbs and rice wine.

    He Wasn’t The Only One

    According to one of Li’s disciples, he had once encountered an even older 500-year-old man, who taught him Qigong exercises and dietary recommendations that would help him extend his lifespan to superhuman proportions. Apart from Qigong and a herb-rich diet, what else can we learn from this Master of Longevity?

    How about this: On his death bed, Li famously said, “I have done all that I have to do in this world”. Could his peaceful last words also hint at one of the biggest secrets to a long and prosperous life? It’s interesting to note that in the West, we’re often taught to believe that aging is something that must be “beaten” with high tech infrared devices and state of the art medication.
    His Secret To Long Health:

    Li was asked what his secret was to longevity. This was his reply: “Keep a quiet heart, sit like a tortoise, walk sprightly like a pigeon and sleep like a dog.” These were the words of advice Li gave to Wu Pei-fu, the warlord, who took Li into his house to learn the secret of extremely long life.

    Li maintained that inward calm and peace of mind combined with breathing techniques were the secrets to incredible longevity. Obviously, his diet would have played a large role. But its fascinating that the old living person in recorded history attributes his long life to his state of mind.

    Read on: http://simplecapacity.com/2016/05/256-years-old-breaks-silence-death-reveals-secrets-world/

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    Re: Stories for reflection

    Post  mudra on Thu Jul 06, 2017 2:54 pm

    Control this madness before it's too late.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J1gRRiViOdU


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    Re: Stories for reflection

    Post  Carol on Sat Jul 08, 2017 10:51 am

    Love this mudra. Thank you for sharing this story. Flowers


    His Secret To Long Health:

    Li was asked what his secret was to longevity. This was his reply: “Keep a quiet heart, sit like a tortoise, walk sprightly like a pigeon and sleep like a dog.”


    _________________
    What is life?
    It is the flash of a firefly in the night, the breath of a buffalo in the wintertime. It is the little shadow which runs across the grass and loses itself in the sunset.

    With deepest respect ~ Aloha & Mahalo, Carol
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    Re: Stories for reflection

    Post  mudra on Sun Jul 09, 2017 7:25 am

    Carol wrote:
    His Secret To Long Health:

    Li was asked what his secret was to longevity. This was his reply: “Keep a quiet heart, sit like a tortoise, walk sprightly like a pigeon and sleep like a dog.”

    Sounds good Thubs Up

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    Re: Stories for reflection

    Post  mudra on Sun Jul 09, 2017 7:27 am

    The incredible story of how leopard Diabolo became Spirit - Anna Breytenbach, "animal communicator".

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gvwHHMEDdT0


    I just want to share this message as much as possible without any commercial intent, personal benefit or whatsoever. All used materials and therefore copyrights do not belong to me. I hope you enjoy discovering and watching this story and skill as much as I did: What if you could talk to animals and have them talk back to you? Anna Breytenbach has dedicated her life to what she calls interspecies communication. She sends detailed messages to animals through pictures and thoughts. She then receives messages of remarkable clarity back from the animals. In this section, Anna transforms a deadly snarling leopard into a relaxed content cat. The amazing story of how leopard Diabolo became Spirit...

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    Re: Stories for reflection

    Post  mudra on Tue Oct 24, 2017 2:56 pm


    Olena Marukhnyak

    The Perception of Time

    With the turn of centuries, time has become to be perceived as the most valuable thing in life. While some see time as a holder of endless possibilities and opportunities, others tend to fear it since it cannot be slowed down, stopped, or turned back. With modernization and industrialization, we have begun to strife to control time. It is seen as a potential barrier to achieving goals, since there are always deadlines to meet and frameworks to fit in. This has sparked the attempts to construct and order time, seeking to find order.

    Before the concept of clock time was introduced in the 19 th century, everything was based on the natural time. This included everything from seasonal changes to sunsets and sunrises.However, the unpredictability of nature caused fear, for it was believed to be the reason for chaos. To keep a society and its members under control, collective ways of relating to the past and the future had to be established. Everyone’s activities had to be synchronized to follow one general pattern. This is the cause of cultures developing their own perceptions of time.

    Before time was seen as one continuous line, it revolved around in circles because of the order of nature. The first linear organization of time can be traced to the monasteries of medieval Europe. Max Weber believes that monks saw a need for rationalized conduct in order to overcome the natural state. It would help them overcome the dependence on impulses and the world of nature. Rational action and proper time keeping would prevent people from wasting time. The sole concept of “wasting time” never existed before societies began to industrialize and fast-paced lives became a virtue.

    After one country began operation under a specific order, others had to follow. This led to the globalization of the day and the concept of world time. Everything became dependent on clock time, pace and tempo stressed more than ever. Time was industrialized, and now was imposed and adopted by various cultures. To be modern and progressive you had to be fast, in sync with the rest of the world. Time has also become an abstract exchange value. We now not only pay for the goods we acquire, but for all the time that was spent in the process of those goods being made and delivered. Something is considered to be more valuable if someone spent a year on than if it was made in a week, even if the quality is the same. Karl Marx believed that there is a need to intensify labor time in order for employees to be profitable and competitive.Everything has to be put under the stress of time. The new time perception allows us to rearrange past, present, and future. Electric lights have allowed us to colonize the night, and now darkness is no longer a barrier to our productivity.

    However, with the globalization of time each culture has found different ways of incorporating this concept into their own society. Industry and economy play a big role in creating these differences. Countries that are better developed and industrialized tend to have a completely different concept of time than the third world countries. When society is not dominated my machinery, nature and instincts have a bit more say in our actions.

    The United States

    Industrialization has taken a great toll on the US. With an active and expanding economy time is greatly valued. The level of development in a country is directly proportional to the amount of free time of its citizens. The more developed the nation – the less time people have to themselves. There is always stress to get things done, since more and more things are now
    needed to be done in the first place. When the society is mainly agricultural, people’s main concern is the weather and the amount of produce collected. The weather now has a minimal effect on our society, since it has no effect on the machines and technology we are now dominated by. Our technological advancement has come to the point where we’re able to create the NIST-7, a clock that will measure time with maximum precision for the next million years.This shows how dependent and obsessed Americans are with measuring and controlling time.

    Values of a country have a great effect on its time perception. Individualistic countries move faster than those that stress collectivism. The US stresses the individual and emphasizes achievement of one rather than conformity to a group and its success. We believe that one has endless possibilities and opportunities to achieve their goals, thus prompting people to work towards the realization of these goals. The Protestant work ethic introduced the “time is money” mindset. From the moment on, this has been the driving force of American lives. Every moment counts. If you have already done some work today but have free time on your hands now, you should go and do some more work. If you don’t have free time, then you’re doing a good job.Stress of individualism puts a lot of stress on a person in the US. We feel like if we don’t do what we were supposed to do at the time we were supposed to do it – hell will freeze over. In societies that stress collectivism, individuals do not worry as much about getting things done.Since everyone is responsible for the same thing, then if you don’t do something it means that someone else will do it. So why should you if you don’t feel like it? In US, there are very little feeling involved. We do what the clock tells us to. If it’s past midday, we have lunch. If it’s past six o’clock, we have dinner. If it’s ten at night, we go to bed. We don’t eat when we’re hungry and sleep when we’re tired, for there are designated times to do these things and going against
    the clock is outrageous.

    As a culture, Americans are very impatient. Due to the stress of time and constant lack thereof, we have great urgency to do things before it’s too late. We become stressed, nervous,and angry if we’re running late for an appointment or being behind a certain deadline. An example our lack of stress toleration is provided by Edward Hall, who has observed the distribution of public bathrooms in the US. We try to deny the existence of this sense of urgency by taking great measures to hide the location of a restroom. “Americans are the people who judge the advancement of others by their plumbing.”(Edward Hall)

    The tempo of our life affects out perception of duration. If what we do is interesting and entertaining, time seems to fly by. Since this is the concept Americans strive for (moving as fast as possible), we have a great need for variety in every of its aspects. Variety prevents us from being bored, which in its turn causes time to go by much slower. When time is going by slowly,Americans face terror. When there is nothing to do, the situation if perceived to be awkward and very uncomfortable. To keep ourselves occupied, we always try to come up with new things to do, games to play, cars to drive, magazines to read, and TV shows to watch. This is the sole reason for having hundreds of TV channels, even though no sane person will watch all 300 of them on a regular basis. Americans like rapid and perpetual change. This puts stress on media,fashion, and music industries. They always have to come up with something new for us to be obsessed with.

    Mechanical clocks have first been introduced to mark the beginning and ending of activities. This has evolved into scheduling and organization of social events. Now, we use clocks to regulate the speed of our actions. Before the clock, there was no way to do things like walking too fast or too slow. You just walked at your own pace. This is not the case now, for if you walk too slowly, you will be late to your appointment at three, which in its turn will delay the appointment at six, which will just mess up your whole day. The clock has come to dictate the flow of life. People arrange themselves around the clock and follow the socially accepted time frames rather than their own biological clock. A man’s actions are now synchronized.Being efficient can be considered as one of American values. The Systems and procedures Association of America has developed target times for daily activities. For example,

    Open and close file drawer: .026 seconds

    Close center drawer: .027 seconds

    Close side drawer: .015 seconds

    Get up from chair: .033 seconds

    Turn in swivel chair: .009 seconds

    Move chair to adjoining desk or file: .050 seconds It seems almost surreal that Americans have calculated such precise times for doing things we barely take a notice of. It only adds to our obsession with efficiency and time preservation.Would taking .05 seconds to turn in a swivel chair be such a big of a crime? No, but you still should not do it since you will lose time which can be used to do something more efficient…

    In a world where time cannot be measured, there are no clocks, no calendars, no definite appointments. Events are triggered by other events,not by time. A house is begun when stone and lumber arrive at the building site. The stone quarry delivers stone when the quarry man needs money.Trains leave the station when the cars are filled with passengers.
    (Einstein’sDreams, by Alan Lightman)Things in nature happen not because they have schedules to follow or appointments to visit, but because they choose to. People can also choose to do things when they believe it is time for these things to be done. The Earth would not stop revolving if you ate lunch at three rather than at two or if you went to sleep at eleven rather than ten or even if you were late to an appointment by a few minutes. However, in the US punctuality is not questioned. It is nearly worshipped. We do what the clock tells us and not what our body does. Scheduling and organization has become so important that when we think of time we usually see two things – a clock on a wall and a calendar or a planner

    The American time is linear time. We see time as one continuous motion forward,without stops or breaks. This creates a sense of responsibility for fulfilling all the stops along the line in order not to let anything just pass by. Americans want to grasp everything they possibly can and have fear of losing time.


    Japan

    Japan’s time perception is based mostly on cultural norms and values rather than on economic notions. However, during the times when Japan was still considered to be a poor and technologically superior, not working until you had absolutely no strength left was a sin. This country was relatively late in modernizing but very fast in doing so.

    In Japan, working is everything. There is no fine line between work and play like there isin the US. Their workday does not have a rigid starting and ending time. They have been socialized to work as hard as they can and never take breaks for personal reasons. Since they are so used to always being occupied, they have concepts such as Nichiyoy byou or “Sunday Disease” and Kyuujitu byou or “The Holiday Syndrome”. The Japanese actually experience physical pain when have nothing to do. It seems as if while working, they enjoy life, but once out of work, they cannot stand it.

    The workaholism of the Japanese stems from the notion of giri, or one’s duties and obligations to the society and its expectations. They like everything to be planned out and put in an orderly manner. Commitment to a company doesn’t begin and end at a specific time; it is an ever ending responsibility. One cannot put himself before the group, for that disrupts the harmony, or the wa. Social harmony predominates speed and competition.
    It is not as important o do better that everyone else, but rather as much as everyone else. Doing better disrupts the harmony and the natural order of things.

    The Japanese work long hours but the production is not as great as would be expected from such a society. The reason for this is that work is not production oriented, but rather fulfilling your obligations to the society. However, time cannot be wasted. Free time is not what Americans regard as free time – leisure activity. In Japan, everything the people do is valued.Even empty space is not really empty. The word ma,or spaces or intervals between objects,signifies that there is no emptiness but rather the space is full of nothing. Time is important under any circumstances; it cannot be wasted by any means. A worker must always seem busy and like he’s doing something, even though no actual job needs to be done at the moment. The yoka, or time left, is not regarded to be equal in value to working time.
    Because the Japanese view hard work as a virtue, they have a notion of karoshi,or death by overwork.
    It is a quite common phenomenon, since hotlines have been established for people to call and talk to others if they think they are in danger of overworking.

    Being fast is seen as being virtuous. If you move slowly in Japan, you are wasting time and not fulfilling your obligations. They always have to keep busy, take as many work days as possible and as little vacations as possible. The only reason someone takes a vacation is if the domestic market is down. In such a situation the need for consumers increases in order to pick economy back up, and the only time people buy things is when they have free time. At such an instance, the government urges workers to take vacations and threatens them to lose their jobs if not done as told. The Japanese also have a low tolerance of tardiness. Their trains are considered to be on time if the delay is less than one minute. For the Westerners, the accepted “on-time”notion is 1-14 minutes. If the train is 15 minutes late, it is only then delayed. This shows how important time is for the Japanese and how valued it is in the society.

    Mexico

    In lesser developed countries such as Mexico, time and money are independent quantities. Just because you have a lot of free time does not mean you can instead fill it up with work and exceed in life. There are not as many job opportunities as in more developed countries,thus decreasing the importance of preserving time. They live at their own pace, not the one dictated by the machines and norms.There is a saying in Mexico,dar tiempo al tiempo or “give time to time.”

    Mexicans agree that time is the most valuable thing a person has, but for a different reasons. They believe that it should not be wasted to create “inorganic monetary units” and instead used to enjoy life. Letting time go is not a sin as it is for the US and Japan. Being late for an appointment is not as important as your social relations. If one needs to go see a family member or a friend while knowing they have an appointment, they still go and see the person they want to see. There are fewer incentives in Mexico to be on time, for it is not required of them by the society nor will It improve their overall well being. They live with time.

    Burundi

    In Central Africa, people are guided by the seasonal changes since they are an agricultural society. The obsession with the clock time did not yet catch up to them, nor will it dois in the near future. Appointments people make are regulated by natural cycles and once again not by a mechanical clock. How people relate to time is based on activities of the cows, since

    they are the most common animals and the easiest to relate to. When someone wants to make a late afternoon appointment, they say “I’ll see you when the cows go out.”Being precise is seen as too much of a hassle and is not looked favorably upon. An hour earlier or later does not really matter, since of someone said they will be at a place in the midday,they will be there. Even though making appointments at night gets difficult, they do not see a need for quantities of time. They refer to a very dark night as the “Who are you?” night, since it is so dark they cannot see each other’s face. To make an appointment at night, they define on how dark or light it will be at that time.This society has no need for the precision of a clock. They are driven by forces of natureand rely on their biological clock. There is no need to hurry, for what is there now will still be there a few minutes later.

    The Piraha Tribe

    The Piraha Tribe which is located in the Amazon rainforest is the only culture in the world that does not have a creation myth. They have no numbers or a written language for that matter wither. They do not have past tense. Everything exists in the present. If it is not here right now, then it does not exist.The language of the Piraha tribe is very limited, consisting of humming and whistling.They do not write and do not memorize things. These people don’t tell stories of their ancestors and very few can remember their grandparents’ names. Since they have no way of talking about the past, it ceases to exist. This, they have no stories of where they came from or how the world was created. All they say is “The world is made.”

    Time is a quantity beyond their grasp. They rely purely on nature and their instincts, with which they are greatly intact. There are no numbers to give time value to. The only word they have for a quantity is
    hoi,
    or small, little in amount, close to one. They don’t see a need to define time, and have been able to survive for centuries without this notion.The Piraha refer only to the immediate personal experiences. They are not interested inthe past nor the future. They live here and now. Everything is anchored in the present. They do not try to control nature nor organize forces beyond their grasp like the modern societies do.They are content with today’s day and live without a tomorrow in mind.

    Levine, Robert. A Geography of time.New York: Harper Collins Publishers Inc., 1997.
    Richard Whipp, Barbara Adam, and Ida Sabelis. Making Time.New York: Oxford UniversityPress, 2002.
    Zimbardo, Phillip and John Boyd. The Time Paradox. New York: Free Press, 2008.
    Marx, Karl. The Communist Manifesto.New York: Penguin Books, 2006.
    Lightman, Alan. Einstein’s Dreams.New York: Warner Books, 1994.
    Davies, Elizabeth. “Unlocking the Secret Sounds of Language: Life Without Time or Numbers.”The Independent Science.May 6, 2006.
    Rafaela von Bredow. “Living Without Numbers or Time.” Spiegel International.May 3, 2006.
    Foley, Hugh and Margaret Matlin. “Sensation and Perception.”http://www.skidmore.edu/~hfoley/Time.htm

    This article can be downloaded on Scribd: Arrow https://www.scribd.com/doc/24699041/Perception-of-Time-in-Different-Cultures

    Love Always
    mudra







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    Vidya Moksha

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    Re: Stories for reflection

    Post  Vidya Moksha on Wed Oct 25, 2017 4:12 pm

    mudra wrote:
    Olena Marukhnyak  

    The Perception of Time

    Before the concept of clock time was introduced in the 19 th century, everything was based on the natural time.

    from the vedic scriptures, a couple of thousand years old..

    1 nimesha = 0.088 seconds = 1 blink of an eye
    18 nimeshas = 1 kashtha
    2.5 kashthas= 1 shvasa = 1 breath (4 seconds)
    6 shvasas= 1 pala
    2 palas= 1 kala
    30 kalas= 1 ghati
    2 ghatis= 1 muhurta (48 minutes)
    30 muhurtas=1 day
    15 days= 1 paksha
    2 pakshas= 1 masa (month)
    6 masas = 1 ayana (solstice)
    2 ayanas = 1 varsha (year)
    4,320,000,000 varshas = 1 kalpa (day or night of brahma)

    At the end of 1 kalpa all life on the planet is destroyed = the ptalaya (deluge). At the end of the next kapla, life is reborn.

    perhaps olena's research needs to go back a little ? Wink
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    mudra

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    Re: Stories for reflection

    Post  mudra on Thu Oct 26, 2017 5:48 am

    Vidya Moksha wrote:
    mudra wrote:
    Olena Marukhnyak  

    The Perception of Time

    Before the concept of clock time was introduced in the 19 th century, everything was based on the natural time.

    from the vedic scriptures, a couple of thousand years old..

    1 nimesha = 0.088 seconds = 1 blink of an eye
    18 nimeshas = 1 kashtha
    2.5 kashthas= 1 shvasa = 1 breath (4 seconds)
    6 shvasas= 1 pala
    2 palas= 1 kala
    30 kalas= 1 ghati
    2 ghatis= 1 muhurta (48 minutes)
    30 muhurtas=1 day
    15 days= 1 paksha
    2 pakshas= 1 masa (month)
    6 masas = 1 ayana (solstice)
    2 ayanas = 1 varsha (year)
    4,320,000,000 varshas = 1 kalpa (day or night of brahma)

    At the end of 1 kalpa all life on the planet is destroyed = the ptalaya (deluge). At the end of the next kapla, life is reborn.

    perhaps olena's research needs to go back a little ? Wink

    Haha times kills Wink

    Historical research wasn't the aim of Olena's research I believe Vidhya.
    The subject was devoted to the relationship various cultures have with time.
    From being subject to mental time to simple presence of being where time doesn't exist.

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    Vidya Moksha

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    Re: Stories for reflection

    Post  Vidya Moksha on Thu Oct 26, 2017 6:09 am

    mudra wrote:
    Olena Marukhnyak  

    Before the concept of clock time was introduced in the 19 th century, everything was based on the natural time.
    mudra wrote:
    Haha times kills Wink

    Historical research wasn't the aim of Olena's research I believe Vidhya.
    The subject was devoted to the relationship  various cultures have with time.
    From being subject to  mental time to simple presence of being where time doesn't exist.

    Love from me
    mudra

    Yes, I got that, Wink I was just been a tad pedantic about that one line above. Just because clocks are a recent invention doesnt mean societies have not been using similar time measures for a long 'time'...

    just pleased I am not living in Japan Wink

    and i know time doesnt exist, only as mental construct.

    i dont own a watch, or a clock... but i cant remove my british culture, i am never late for appointments...
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    mudra

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    Re: Stories for reflection

    Post  mudra on Thu Oct 26, 2017 9:00 am

    Vidya Moksha wrote:

    Yes, I got that, Wink I was just been a tad pedantic about that one line above. Just because clocks are a recent invention doesnt mean societies have not been using similar time measures for a long 'time'...

    just pleased I am not living in Japan Wink

    and i know time doesnt exist, only as mental construct.

    i dont own a watch, or a clock... but i cant remove my british culture, i am never late for appointments...

    I don't own a watch either. I do own a clock just to know what time it is that everyone agrees upon around me but I don't use it to wake me up in the morning. I wake up by my own. In the summer when I can afford to sit on my balcony for a while I know what time it is just by watching the sun's position in the sky.I think this is something people rarely do that live in a big city like mine :)

    I found the above article interesting showing what a great means of controlling the masses the invention of the clock is.
    The more we rely on these mechanical things the less we use our natural abilities.
    Kali Yuga... the age of baggage as JoeEcho would say Wink

    Love from me
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    mudra

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    Re: Stories for reflection

    Post  mudra on Wed Mar 21, 2018 12:51 pm

    Holly Butcher's last message before she passed away at age 26 early january 2018



    It’s a strange thing to realise and accept your mortality at 26 years young. It’s just one of those things you ignore. The days tick by and you just expect they will keep on coming; Until the unexpected happens. I always imagined myself growing old, wrinkled and grey- most likely caused by the beautiful family (lots of kiddies) I planned on building with the love of my life. I want that so bad it hurts.

    That’s the thing about life; It is fragile, precious and unpredictable and each day is a gift, not a given right.

    I’m 27 now. I don’t want to go. I love my life. I am happy.. I owe that to my loved ones. But the control is out of my hands.

    I haven’t started this ‘note before I die’ so that death is feared - I like the fact that we are mostly ignorant to it’s inevitability.. Except when I want to talk about it and it is treated like a ‘taboo’ topic that will never happen to any of us.. That’s been a bit tough. I just want people to stop worrying so much about the small, meaningless stresses in life and try to remember that we all have the same fate after it all so do what you can to make your time feel worthy and great, minus the bullshit.

    I have dropped lots of my thoughts below as I have had a lot of time to ponder life these last few months. Of course it’s the middle of the night when these random things pop in my head most!

    Those times you are whinging about ridiculous things (something I have noticed so much these past few months), just think about someone who is really facing a problem. Be grateful for your minor issue and get over it. It’s okay to acknowledge that something is annoying but try not to carry on about it and negatively effect other people’s days.

    Once you do that, get out there and take a freaking big breath of that fresh Aussie air deep in your lungs, look at how blue the sky is and how green the trees are; It is so beautiful. Think how lucky you are to be able to do just that - breathe.

    You might have got caught in bad traffic today, or had a bad sleep because your beautiful babies kept you awake, or your hairdresser cut your hair too short. Your new fake nails might have got a chip, your boobs are too small, or you have cellulite on your arse and your belly is wobbling.

    Let all that XXXX go.. I swear you will not be thinking of those things when it is your turn to go. It is all SO insignificant when you look at life as a whole. I’m watching my body waste away right before my eyes with nothing I can do about it and all I wish for now is that I could have just one more Birthday or Christmas with my family, or just one more day with my partner and dog. Just one more.

    I hear people complaining about how terrible work is or about how hard it is to exercise - Be grateful you are physically able to. Work and exercise may seem like such trivial things ... until your body doesn’t allow you to do either of them.

    I tried to live a healthy life, in fact, that was probably my major passion. Appreciate your good health and functioning body- even if it isn’t your ideal size. Look after it and embrace how amazing it is. Move it and nourish it with fresh food. Don’t obsess over it.

    Remember there are more aspects to good health than the physical body.. work just as hard on finding your mental, emotional and spiritual happiness too. That way you might realise just how insignificant and unimportant having this stupidly portrayed perfect social media body really is.. While on this topic, delete any account that pops up on your news feeds that gives you any sense of feeling XXXX about yourself. Friend or not.. Be ruthless for your own well-being.

    Be grateful for each day you don’t have pain and even the days where you are unwell with man flu, a sore back or a sprained ankle, accept it is XXXX but be thankful it isn’t life threatening and will go away.

    Whinge less, people! .. And help each other more.

    Give, give, give. It is true that you gain more happiness doing things for others than doing them for yourself. I wish I did this more. Since I have been sick, I have met the most incredibly giving and kind people and been the receiver of the most thoughtful and loving words and support from my family, friends and strangers; More than I could I ever give in return. I will never forget this and will be forever grateful to all of these people.

    It is a weird thing having money to spend at the end.. when you’re dying. It’s not a time you go out and buy material things that you usually would, like a new dress. It makes you think how silly it is that we think it is worth spending so much money on new clothes and ‘things’ in our lives.

    Buy your friend something kind instead of another dress, beauty product or jewellery for that next wedding. 1. No-one cares if you wear the same thing twice 2. It feels good. Take them out for a meal, or better yet, cook them a meal. Shout their coffee. Give/ buy them a plant, a massage or a candle and tell them you love them when you give it to them.

    Value other people’s time. Don’t keep them waiting because you are XXXX at being on time. Get ready earlier if you are one of those people and appreciate that your friends want to share their time with you, not sit by themselves, waiting on a mate. You will gain respect too! Amen sister.

    This year, our family agreed to do no presents and despite the tree looking rather sad and empty (I nearly cracked Christmas Eve!), it was so nice because people didn’t have the pressure of shopping and the effort went into writing a nice card for each other. Plus imagine my family trying to buy me a present knowing they would probably end up with it themselves.. strange! It might seem lame but those cards mean more to me than any impulse purchase could. Mind you, it was also easier to do in our house because we had no little kiddies there. Anyway, moral of the story- presents are not needed for a meaningful Christmas. Moving on.

    Use your money on experiences.. Or at least don’t miss out on experiences because you spent all your money on material XXXX.

    Put in the effort to do that day trip to the beach you keep putting off. Dip your feet in the water and dig your toes in the sand. Wet your face with salt water.

    Get amongst nature.

    Try just enjoying and being in moments rather than capturing them through the screen of your phone. Life isn’t meant to be lived through a screen nor is it about getting the perfect photo.. enjoy the bloody moment, people! Stop trying to capture it for everyone else.

    Random rhetorical question. Are those several hours you spend doing your hair and make up each day or to go out for one night really worth it? I’ve never understood this about females
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    mudra

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    Re: Stories for reflection

    Post  mudra on Sat Apr 14, 2018 1:58 pm

    This Woman Rescued A Bumblebee Queen And Now, They’re Best Buddies

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dc7qQXRq-l8


    Fiona Presly was out in her garden in Scotland when she nearly stepped on a bumblebee. It would be the start of an unusual and touching bond with the insect, one that could change the way she would look at bees forever.

    Love Always
    mudra

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