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    HigherLove

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    Pacific Gas & Electric (PG&E)

    Post  HigherLove on Sun Mar 20, 2011 9:24 pm

    I had started hijacking this thread: http://www.themistsofavalon.net/t2163-california-san-andreas-fault-over-75-earth-quake-expected-march-19th-21st-warning (sorry Carol). Since I was really burning to get this out, another thread...

    HigherLove wrote:Thanks, Carol.

    Per my edits above, the most recent quake in Northern California was a few miles from me, in the geysers. :op

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Geysers

    "The Geysers geothermal development spans an area of around 78 km² (30 mi²) in Sonoma, Lake and Mendocino counties in California, located in the Mayacamas Mountains. Power from The Geysers provides electricity to Sonoma, Lake, Mendocino, Marin, and Napa counties. It is estimated that the development meets 60 % of the power demand for the coastal region between the Golden Gate Bridge and the Oregon state line."


    Carry on...

    http://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/recenteqsus/Quakes/nc71544341.php

    2 km (1 miles) NE (52°) from The Geysers, CA
    6 km (4 miles) WSW (243°) from Cobb, CA***
    9 km (6 miles) WNW (294°) from Anderson Springs, CA
    20 km (12 miles) E (87°) from Cloverdale, CA
    41 km (25 miles) N (350°) from Santa Rosa, CA
    118 km (73 miles) WNW (284°) from Sacramento, CA


    ***Cobb is where this sort of kicked into high gear for me (getting stuck in the snow near the geysers). I am still waiting for them to finish repairs on my car.
    ___________________

    Signing off, for now.

    I'm not feeling pessimistic.

    But just in case...You are loved

    I trust my energies have been spent well, and that I am granted a great rest in merciful arms, as so many others remain vigilant.

    UFO2


    _____________________

    Hinkley is in S/E California, not N/W, like me. This is just for effect, but if they can do something like this...


    ...and nuclear power on the sea of Southern California...

    <object width="425" height="349"><param name="movie" value="https://www.youtube.com/v/pAnjbp2c5KU?fs=1&hl=en_US&rel=0"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="https://www.youtube.com/v/pAnjbp2c5KU?fs=1&hl=en_US&rel=0" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="425" height="349"></embed></object>

    HigherLove wrote:This is from within the last hour, again. This is all the geysers. As noted, they are pumping treated wastewater back into the field in order to continue producing steam to turn the turbines.

    <a href="http://illiweb.com/fa/pbucket.gif" target="_blank"><img src="https://2img.net/h/i835.photobucket.com/albums/zz272/DSummerMan65/todayquake.gif" border="0" alt="Photobucket"></a>


    Edit:

    When PG&E first started doing this, residents of Anderson Springs (near me) were having quakes that were strong enough to topple brick chimneys. As a result, the flow rate was adjusted to reduce the shaking.

    http://www.themistsofavalon.net/t2182-haarp-ring-over-europe-a-sign-of-something-to-come-march-17-2011#40280

    Carol wrote:

    SMOKING GUN on MAN MADE Earthquakes! March 20, 2011
    dutchsinse — Mar 20, 2011 — link to PDF from the Eurpoean seismic agency .. seminar on MAN MADE earthquakes.. aka "induced seismicity" http://www.emsc-csem.org/Doc/M<wbr>eetings/ECGS_FKPE_workshop_fir<wbr>st_circular.pdf *************** credit to youtube user: xDarkcynx subscribe to their channel here ! https://www.youtube.com/user/xD<wbr>arkcynx good find! you deserve a gold medal for putting us one step closer to stopping the destruction of our planet! you sir, have done humanity a service! xDarkcynx lol have a field day with this proof that they have man made Seismicity and they actually run workshops on it http://www.emsc-csem.org/Doc/M<wbr>eetings/ECGS_FKPE_workshop_fir<wbr>st_circular.pdf wish i could go to the next 1 got so many questions peace **************** yes, PEACE and love to one another during these extraordinary times! the truth SHALL prevail ! keep up the good fight! dutchsinse

    QUOTE: Well, we now know that there are seven massively huge plumes of asphalt/abiotic fluid gushing up right next to a major salt dome, in the Gulf of Mexico. Today, 4 U.S. Military double rotor helicopters flew north along the mid Florida coastline. I've never seen them do that before. I wonder if they know something that we don't know? If the floor of the Gulf of Mexico goes, due to the open fissures and depletion of the salt dome by the Macondo well, Florida might get sucked into the vortex!
    Note to self: At 2:02, he mentions the geysers in Nor Cal.


    __________________________________________________________________

    <a href="http://illiweb.com/fa/pbucket.gif" target="_blank"><img src="https://2img.net/h/i835.photobucket.com/albums/zz272/DSummerMan65/geysers3.gif" border="0"></a>

    Again, within the last hour -

    Magnitude 3.3
    Date-Time Sunday, March 20, 2011 at 22:08:33 UTC
    Sunday, March 20, 2011 at 03:08:33 PM at epicenter

    Time of Earthquake in other Time Zones

    Location 38.837°N, 122.756°W
    Depth 1.2 km (~0.7 mile)
    Region NORTHERN CALIFORNIA
    Distances 3 km (2 miles) W (274°) from Cobb, CA
    6 km (4 miles) NE (46°) from The Geysers, CA
    9 km (6 miles) NW (321°) from Anderson Springs, CA

    23 km (14 miles) E (79°) from Cloverdale, CA
    43 km (27 miles) N (354°) from Santa Rosa, CA
    116 km (72 miles) WNW (286°) from Sacramento, CA

    Location Uncertainty horizontal +/- 0.1 km (0.1 miles); depth +/- 0.2 km (0.1 miles)
    Parameters Nph= 51, Dmin=0 km, Rmss=0.08 sec, Gp= 54°,
    M-type=local magnitude (ML), Version=2
    Source California Integrated Seismic Net:
    USGS Caltech CGS UCB UCSD UNR

    Event ID nc71545631

    ___________________

    Calpine:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Calpine
    __________________________________

    Deep Heat Mining


    http://askville.amazon.com/technology-deep-heat-mining-Swiss-generate-steam-widely/AnswerViewer.do?requestId=2595275

    Because the technology isn't ready yet


    As far as I can tell, the Swiss are only experimenting with deep heat mining, and they haven't applied it on any large scale yet, either. You can't expand the application of the technology until the bugs have been worked out, and you don't know what the bugs are until you try. I can only guess at some of the problems they'll encounter, but here some things I can forsee:

    Digging that deep isn't trivial. We do it, but the technology is expensive. An entrepreneur who wishes to do the first experiment has to scrape up a lot of money.

    Once you get to the heat, you have to get it where you need it. You can pour water into the hole, but then you have to get the steam to the generator.

    How much will the steam cool before it gets to the generator?

    How do you build a pipe to carry it, and make sure it won't corrode?

    How much power can you actually get from a bore-hole? The heat down there is essentially infinite, but it moves slowly.

    If you pour water on a hot rock, it cools down. It'll heat up again, but how fast? That rate limits how much power you can get out, which in turn limits how cost-effective it is to get the energy out.

    Is it safe? You're pumping out high-pressure, high-temperature steam. How do you go about making sure that that's all safe.

    Obviously these are problems the Swiss think they can solve; they don't seem insoluble to me. There are certainly other problems I can't imagine, because I'm not a geotechnical engineer (but if you still don't believe me, I know geotechnical engineers and get more details from them).

    I hope they do solve them. I don't know if we're at "peak oil" or not, but I know that burning oil is bad both politically and environmentally even if there were plenty of it. And I hope that once they've solved the problems, it proliferates quickly.


    <a href="http://illiweb.com/fa/pbucket.gif" target="_blank"><img src="https://2img.net/h/i835.photobucket.com/albums/zz272/DSummerMan65/Wile-E-Coyote1.jpg" border="0" width="100"></a>


    Fracking

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hydraulic_fracturing

    "While the main industrial use of hydraulic fracturing is in stimulating production from oil and gas wells,[7][8][9] hydraulic fracturing is also applied to:

    Stimulating Groundwater wells[10]

    Preconditioning rock for caving or inducing rock to cave in mining[11]

    As a means of enhancing waste remediation processes (usually hydrocarbon waste or spills) or spills.[12]

    Dispose of waste by injection into suitable deep rock formations

    As a method to measure the stress in the earth."
    _______________________________________________________________

    I should also mention that this area is near some old mines (cinnabar for mercury).

    Mercury Contamination from Historic Gold Mining in California:

    http://ca.water.usgs.gov/mercury/fs06100.html

    Mines in Lake County, California:


    http://californiamaps.org/map.php?county=Lake&type=mine

    Borax Lake:

    http://www.mindat.org/loc-3437.html

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Borax_Lake_Site

    Sulphur Bank Mine and Borax Lake

    http://bioregion.ucdavis.edu/book/10_Clear_Lake/10_21_cl_sulphur.html

    The UC Davis team studying the mercury problem in Clear Lake for EPA has documented a classic case of food chain accumulation of mercury. Small invertebrates near the base of the food chain have methyl mercury levels around a few hundredths of a part per million. Small fish run around a tenth of a part per million. Big, long-lived predatory fish-the bass and catfish that appeal to most consumers-run about 1 part per million. Osprey run around 2 parts per million. The levels of methyl mercury in shellfish eaten by the Japanese people who were poisoned in the 1950s at Minamata Bay had mercury concentrations around 10 parts per million, so it is probably impossible for an adult to contract mercury poisoning from eating Clear Lake fish. The DHS warning reflects, as it should, a safety factor. The objective of the EPA cleanup is to reduce influx of inorganic mercury into the lake so that natural burial of the contaminated sediments eventually reduces the supply of mercury for the methylation process and brings fish methyl mercury concentrations back into the safe range. UC Davis investigators estimate that five to ten years should be sufficient to dramatically reduce the inorganic mercury available at the sediment surface, once the ongoing supply is stopped.

    Clear Lake:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clear_Lake_(California)

    Heavy metal contamination

    The lake is heavily contaminated with mercury from the nearby Sulphur Bank Mercury Mine.[1][2] The nearby abandoned mine was declared a Superfund site in the early 1990s [3][4][5] and is still undergoing cleanup. The California Department of Fish and Game presently recommends that women of childbearing age and children limit their consumption of certain fish from Clear Lake, due to the presence of methylmercury compounds in lake sediments.[6]

    <a href="http://illiweb.com/fa/pbucket.gif" target="_blank"><img src="https://2img.net/h/i835.photobucket.com/albums/zz272/DSummerMan65/ClearLake.jpg" border="0" alt="Photobucket"></a>

    I would not be so bold as to suggest that we have been raping this particular pice of real estate for a while, or that anybody with dark energies could in any way benefit.

    Arrow PG&E


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    HigherLove

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    Re: Pacific Gas & Electric (PG&E)

    Post  HigherLove on Sun Mar 20, 2011 9:43 pm

    Diablo Canyon Power Plant


    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diablo_Canyon_Power_Plant

    Location of Diablo Canyon Power Plant in California
    Coordinates 35°12′39″N 120°51′22″W / 35.21083°N 120.85611°W / 35.21083; -120.85611Coordinates: 35°12′39″N 120°51′22″W / 35.21083°N 120.85611°W / 35.21083; -120.85611
    Status Operational
    Commission date Unit 1: May 7, 1985
    Unit 2: March 13, 1986
    Licence expiration Unit 1: November 2, 2024
    Unit 2: August 20, 2025
    Owner(s) Pacific Gas & Electric
    Operator(s) Pacific Gas & Electric
    Architect(s) Pacific Gas & Electric

    Reactor information
    Reactors operational 1 x 1118 MW
    1 x 1122 MW
    Reactor type(s) Pressurized water reactor
    Reactor supplier(s) Westinghouse

    Power generation information
    Annual generation 18,588 GW·h
    Net generation 17,091 GW·h
    Website
    PG&E Diablo Canyon
    As of 2011-01-21

    Diablo Canyon Power Plant is an electricity-generating nuclear power plant at Avila Beach in San Luis Obispo County, California. The plant has two Westinghouse-designed 4-loop pressurized-water nuclear reactors operated by Pacific Gas & Electric. The facility is located on about 750 acres (300 ha) in Avila Beach, California. Together, the twin 1,100 MWe reactors produce about 18,000 GW·h of electricity annually, supplying the electrical needs of more than 2.2 million people, sent along the Path 15 500-kV lines that connect to this plant.

    Diablo Canyon was originally designed to withstand a 6.75 magnitude earthquake from four faults, including the nearby San Andreas and Hosgri faults.[1], but was later upgraded to withstand a 7.5 magnitude quake[2]. It has seismic monitoring and safety systems, designed to shut it down promptly in the event of significant ground motion.

    The plant draws its secondary cooling water from the Pacific Ocean, and during heavy storms both units are throttled back by 80 percent to prevent kelp from entering the cooling water intake.

    The plant is located in Nuclear Regulatory Commission Region IV.



    <a href="http://illiweb.com/fa/pbucket.gif" target="_blank"><img src="https://2img.net/h/i835.photobucket.com/albums/zz272/DSummerMan65/reactor.jpg" border="0" alt=width="400"></a>

    <a href="http://illiweb.com/fa/pbucket.gif" target="_blank"><img src="https://2img.net/h/i835.photobucket.com/albums/zz272/DSummerMan65/Diablopic2.jpg" border="0" width="400"></a>



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    HigherLove

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    Re: Pacific Gas & Electric (PG&E)

    Post  HigherLove on Sun Mar 20, 2011 9:57 pm

    HigherLove wrote:Inspired by this quote:

    burgundia wrote:it is a bit off topic, but...how dumb must one be to have built nuclear power plants by the ocean in the country prone to earthquakes?

    From the thread: http://www.themistsofavalon.net/t2085-magnitude-91-near-the-east-coast-of-honshu-japan-march-11-2011

    http://www.themistsofavalon.net/t2131-plate-tectonics-of-the-north-american-west

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    HigherLove

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    Re: Pacific Gas & Electric (PG&E)

    Post  HigherLove on Sun Mar 20, 2011 10:03 pm

    The official BS - It should not come as a surprise that PG&E does not have a good record at this plant. I will look for more information, but it may already be in one of the links posted, here.

    http://www.vcstar.com/news/2011/mar/15/diablo-nuclear-power-plant-has-built-in-safety/

    AVILA BEACH — Diablo Canyon nuclear power plant has several design features that are intended to prevent the kind of crisis facing nuclear power plants in Japan following Friday's devastating earthquake and tsunami.

    In one reactor at the Fukushima Daiichi plant, cooling water was lost, forcing workers to use fire hoses to pump seawater into the reactor to prevent a core meltdown. Chernobyl-like meltdowns such as what took place in that power station in the former Soviet Union have the potential to release large amounts of radiation into the environment.

    A main priority is keeping large pumps operating that circulate cooling water within the reactor. If power is lost, Diablo Canyon — owned by Pacific Gas & Electric Co. — is equipped with diesel generators that can run the pumps. These are maintained and tested on a regular basis, said Kory Raftery, Diablo Canyon spokesman.

    Diablo Canyon, one of two nuclear plants in California, is located about 120 miles north of Ventura County. The other, San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station near San Clemente, is about 130 miles south.

    Diablo Canyon also has several sources of freshwater that can be used to replenish cooling water in the reactors, if it is lost. Using seawater as cooling water is a last resort because it is corrosive to the reactor core.

    The main source of freshwater at Diablo Canyon is a desalination plant that turns ocean water into freshwater. Water is stored in pools on a hill behind the plant that could inject water into the reactor using gravity.

    The property surrounding Diablo Canyon also has several wells that could supply water in an emergency, Raftery said. These sources of water can also be used to replenish water in the plant's two spent-fuel storage pools, if needed.

    Diablo Canyon is considered much less vulnerable to a tsunami than reactors in Japan that sit on low-lying coastal plains. Diablo Canyon sits atop a coastal bluff, 85 feet above sea level.

    The cooling water intake structures that draw ocean water into the plant to condense steam after it has passed through the electrical turbines are surrounded by breakwater that are designed to provide protection from large waves.

    Although earthquakes are Diablo Canyon's main safety concern, seismologists do not believe that faults around the plant are capable of producing the kind of massive 8.9 magnitude quake that struck Japan.

    Diablo Canyon is designed to withstand a 7.5 magnitude quake. Extensive studies done by seismologists with plant owners PG&E, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the U.S. Geological Survey show that four earthquake faults in the vicinity of the plant could produce quakes of no more than 6.5 magnitude.

    The main difference is that faults around Diablo Canyon are strike/slip faults in which tectonic plates slide horizontally past one another. The faults along Japan's coastline are subduction faults, in which one plate slides beneath another, Raftery said.

    Seismologists say subduction faults are capable of delivering more powerful jolts than strike/slip faults and are more likely to displace ocean water, causing tsunamis.

    As required by the federal Nuclear Regulatory Commission, emergency response drills are conducted regularly at the Diablo Canyon to practice dealing with the effects of earthquakes and tsunamis. Numerous state and local agencies participate in these drills.



    Read more: http://www.vcstar.com/news/2011/mar/15/diablo-nuclear-power-plant-has-built-in-safety/#ixzz1HCQQykqG
    - vcstar.com

    ____________________

    Upgraded to withstand a 7.5!?

    They say they are on strike-slip faults, and that they are not on a subduction zone. That is true. However, they are still dangerously close to the San Andreas Fault, which we know is capable of an 8 or 9+!!!!!?????????? AND, what about the blind-thrust faults?

    They have diesel engines for backup (how is that not at all like Japan?).

    The storage ponds that should work by gravity sounds like a great idea, provided they are not compromised.

    ______________________

    Calls heat up for reviews of California Nuclear Plants:

    http://www.sacbee.com/2011/03/20/3490976/calls-heat-up-for-reviews-of-california.html


    Last edited by HigherLove on Sun Mar 20, 2011 11:13 pm; edited 1 time in total
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    HigherLove

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    Re: Pacific Gas & Electric (PG&E)

    Post  HigherLove on Sun Mar 20, 2011 10:23 pm

    http://www.record-bee.com/ci_17571296

    SmartMeters moratorium

    By Jeremy Walsh -- Staff reporter
    Updated: 03/08/2011 11:51:25 PM PST


    LAKEPORT -- The Lake County Board of Supervisors (BOS) Tuesday approved a temporary moratorium on SmartMeter installation in the unincorporated parts of Lake County after a spirited hour-long public hearing on the PG&E device.

    The BOS voted 4-0 to enact the urgency measure effective immediately; along with supporting an amended letter to state legislators in favor of an "opt out" assembly bill and directing county counsel pursue the possibility of injunctive action.

    District 3 Supervisor Denise Rushing recused herself, citing that she is involved with a small engineering consortium that bid on a PG&E contract, unrelated to SmartMeters, and that bid process has not been resolved. The Record-Bee incorrectly reported the reason Rushing recused herself from the March 1 BOS SmartMeters discussion.

    Tuesday's SmartMeters hearing began with two PG&E representatives discussing the installation program and increased educational efforts the company has taken locally in recent weeks. PG&E has added six additional educational centers and supplied local offices with more distributable information about the program, according to the representatives.

    The SmartMeter is a device that would help PG&E and customers better track individual energy use, according to the company.

    PG&E has nearly completed SmartMeter installation statewide, having worked north from southern California, according to the representatives. PG&E has installed more than 39,000 devices in Lake County thus far, according to the PG&E website.

    Around 70 Lake County residents attended the hearing, a mainly anti-installation crowd that applauded several times when the Supervisors' openly questioned the validity and safety of the SmartMeters.

    "I think this is one of those moments when we need to take a stand," District 4 Supervisor Anthony Farrington said.

    More than 10 residents voiced their opposition to SmartMeters, citing among their concerns: possible health issues, increased utility rates, job loss, trespassing and privacy issues.

    The adopted ordinance imposing the moratorium states "because the potential risks to the health, safety and welfare of county residents are so great, the Board of Supervisors wishes to adopt a moratorium on the installation of SmartMeters."

    County staff modeled its ordinance after similar adopted measures in Marin and Santa Cruz counties, according to County Counsel Anita Grant.

    The moratorium went into effect around 12:20 p.m. Tuesday, meaning the county would not allow the installation of SmartMeters or related equipment in the unincorporated areas of Lake County.

    Clearlake and Lakeport would have to take individual actions regarding SmartMeters, according to the Supervisors, because they do not have jurisdiction over those incorporated cities.

    The BOS also approved sending a letter to state legislators in support of Assembly Bill 37, which in part calls for customers to be provided alternatives to SmartMeters.

    The BOS will also support a customer's right to "opt out of SmartMeter installation," in its letter to state legislators.

    The BOS also directed county counsel to pursue injunctive against PG&E to stop SmartMeter installations. The BOS heard that the primary action would be in the form of a complaint or petition to the California Public Utilities Commission.

    Contact Jeremy Walsh at jwalsh@record-bee.com or call him at 263-5636, ext. 37.
    _________________________________________________

    Since the moratorium, PG&E has hired consultants who are aggressively pushing the installation of the meters.

    Some people do not know they can refuse, but if you are not home to decline, they will install them, anyway, and PG&E will say there is nothing they can do and that it is too late.



    STOP SMART METERS:

    http://stopsmartmeters.org/category/pge/


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    HigherLove

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    Re: Pacific Gas & Electric (PG&E)

    Post  HigherLove on Sun Mar 20, 2011 10:33 pm

    <a href="http://illiweb.com/fa/pbucket.gif" target="_blank"><img src="https://2img.net/h/i835.photobucket.com/albums/zz272/DSummerMan65/PGE.jpg" border="0" alt="Photobucket"></a>

    Although PG&E is not forcing anyone into concentration camps, there are recognizable whiffs of fascism in the 'smart' meter rollout- lack of choice, a failure of democracy, and high level collusion between government and corporations

    http://stopsmartmeters.org/
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    Carol
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    Re: Pacific Gas & Electric (PG&E)

    Post  Carol on Sun Mar 20, 2011 10:56 pm

    The PG&E lady drives part way up my driveway, takes out her binoculars and reads our meter with that. Shocked


    _________________
    What is life?
    It is the flash of a firefly in the night, the breath of a buffalo in the wintertime. It is the little shadow which runs across the grass and loses itself in the sunset.

    With deepest respect ~ Aloha & Mahalo, Carol
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    HigherLove

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    Re: Pacific Gas & Electric (PG&E)

    Post  HigherLove on Sun Mar 20, 2011 11:18 pm

    Carol wrote:The PG&E lady drives part way up my driveway, takes out her binoculars and reads our meter with that. Shocked

    LOL

    That is rather benign. I'm sure the fascist power companies are working to replace the force with pod people.

    Next on shopping list:

    Anti Body Snatcher pills.

    Sincerely,

    iR

    iRobot (no really...nothing to worry about)...
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    Re: Pacific Gas & Electric (PG&E)

    Post  Carol on Sun Mar 20, 2011 11:25 pm

    Insanely Happy

    I'm kind of thinking I would like the transfigured type of body. Just remember, if you cross sooner then later head for Sag A and the blue white light for your full DNA upgrade! Oooyeah 1


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    What is life?
    It is the flash of a firefly in the night, the breath of a buffalo in the wintertime. It is the little shadow which runs across the grass and loses itself in the sunset.

    With deepest respect ~ Aloha & Mahalo, Carol
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    Re: Pacific Gas & Electric (PG&E)

    Post  MargueriteBee on Sun Mar 20, 2011 11:28 pm

    Is Clear Lake a caldera?
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    Re: Pacific Gas & Electric (PG&E)

    Post  Carol on Sun Mar 20, 2011 11:32 pm

    Clear Lake and the volcanic field are located within a fault-bounded, locally ... California; it is probably volcano-tectonic in origin, but is not a caldera lake.


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    It is the flash of a firefly in the night, the breath of a buffalo in the wintertime. It is the little shadow which runs across the grass and loses itself in the sunset.

    With deepest respect ~ Aloha & Mahalo, Carol
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    HigherLove

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    Re: Pacific Gas & Electric (PG&E)

    Post  HigherLove on Sun Mar 20, 2011 11:42 pm

    MargueriteBee wrote:Is Clear Lake a caldera?

    It's not even clear. I call it "Opaque Lake".

    _________________________________________


    The link is worth it just for the pretty picture of the non-sustainable vineyards...


    http://www.co.lake.ca.us/Page2593.aspx

    Clear Lake is Unique Clear Lake is the largest, natural freshwater lake in California with 68 square miles of surface area. Lakes have existed at the site of Clear Lake for at least 2,500,000 years, possibly making it the oldest lake in North America.

    The lake has changed shape over time, with a continuous lake for at least the last 450,000 years in the Upper Arm (between Lakeport and Lucerne), while the Oaks Arm and Lower Arm are only about 12,000 years old.

    Clear Lake is very productive and scenic, a lush paradise for fish and wildlife. The high productivity of the Clear Lake Basin attracted Native Americans early in their settlement of North America. Archeological evidence indicates human habitation around Clear lake for the last 12,000 years.

    Known as the Bass Capital of the West, Clear Lake supports large populations of bass, crappie, bluegill, carp and catfish. Two-thirds of the fish caught in Clear Lake are largemouth bass, with a record of 17.52 pounds.

    In addition to fish, there is abundant wildlife within the Basin. There are year-round populations of ducks, pelicans, grebes, blue herons, egrets, and osprey, and winter populations of bald eagles and white pelicans. The Basin also supports abundant populations of deer, bear, mountain lion, raccoon and other animals.

    The expansive warm, water of Clear Lake makes it popular for high activity watersports, such as swimming, water skiing, sailing, boat races, and jetskiing. With its scenic beauty, clean air and abundant wildlife, the Clear Lake is an excellent place to slow down, enjoy nature study,photography or just plain loafing.



    ALGAE

    Along with Clear Lake's high productivity, algae in the lake can create a situation which can be perceived as a problem to humans. Algae are tiny water plants that cycle normally between the bottom and the surface, floating up and sinking down. During the day, algae generate oxygen within the lake; at night they consume oxygen.

    The algae in Clear Lake are part of the natural food chain and keep the lake fertile and healthy. Because of the lake's relative shallowness and warm summer temperatures, the algae serve another important purpose. They keep the sun's rays from reaching the bottom, thus reducing the growth of water weeds which would otherwise choke off the lake.

    Nuisance blue-green algae, however, can be a problem. From more than 130 species of algae identified in Clear Lake, three species of blue-green algae can create problems under certain conditions. These problem blue-greens typically "bloom" twice a year, in spring and late summer. The intensity of the blooms vary from year to year, and are unpredictable. The problem occurs when algae blooms are trapped at the surface and die. When this occurs, unsightly slicks and odors can be produced.

    The most effective method of keeping the algae from becoming a nuisance is to keep them alive and in a normal cycle. This may be done by agitating the water surface to break up the trapped algae, letting the algae sink. Boat traffic and spraying the trapped algae with water have proven effective in breaking up the trapped surface algae.


    FIVE COMMON QUESTIONS


    Is the lake eutrophying or dying?

    The lake is definitely not dying. It is healthy and very much alive. A lake is eutrophic when it is productive in the same way a grassy field is more productive than a desert. Studies indicate that Clear Lake is eutrophic now and has been eutrophic for more than 10,000 years. It is believed blue-green algae populations have increased this century.

    Are dead fish around the lake due to a lack of oxygen in the water?

    Although oxygen levels in land-locked lagoons can get dangerously low for aquatic life, oxygen in the open surface waters of Clear Lake is always high enough to sustain fish. Near the lake bottom, oxygen levels may be lowered, but this area is avoided by fish. Natural conditions of old age, disease and rapid temperature changes are more likely causes of dead fish in Clear Lake.

    Is it safe to swim in the lake?

    Yes, the lake is safe for swimming. Monitoring has shown that the lake consistently meets or exceeds water quality standards for swimming. While swimming in mats of decaying algae isn't pleasant, no adverse health effects have been linked to contact with the algae in Clear Lake.

    Is the lake water safe to drink?

    Disease-causing organisms are present in nearly all surface waters, even crystal clear mountain streams. As with all natural surface waters, drinking water directly from the lake should be avoided. When lake water is properly treated, as it is all around the lake, it is safe to drink.

    Is it safe to eat fish caught in the lake?

    Algae do not affect the edibility of fish. However, due to elevated mercury levels in some of Clear Lake's fish, the advisory from the California Department of Health Services limiting the number of fish consumed should be heeded. Mercury occurs naturally in Clear Lake, although levels have been elevated due to historic mercury mining at Sulphur Bank. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has begun remedial steps including the reinforcement and stabilization of the shoreline to reduce the input of mercury to the lake. Other steps are being investigated.

    REDUCING BLUE-GREEN ALGAE

    The County of Lake has supported research and several projects to reduce the growth of blue-green algae in Clear Lake. Working in cooperation with the State Department of Water Resources and the University of California, Lake County officials completed studies that have shown there is an over-abundance of nutrients (food for the algae) within the lake. Because the lake is so large, spraying algae to reduce nuisance conditions is not a practical long term solution. Reduction of lake nutrient levels is anticipated to reduce the quantities of nuisance, blue-green algae.

    Nutrients come from erosion and other sources within the watershed, the land which drains into Clear Lake. A key to improving the water quality in the lake is to manage the entire watershed. Management tools of erosion control, creek and wetland protection, and vegetation management, are being implemented to improve the water quality of Clear Lake and the quality of life in Lake County by reducing the amount of nutrients in Clear Lake.

    For technical information on Clear Lake, please contact the Lake County Water Resources Department, at (707) 263-2344 or write 255 North Forbes Street, Lakeport, CA 95453.

    For recreation information around Clear Lake, please contact the Lake County Marketing Program at (800) 525-3743, (707) 274-5652, or write 255 North Forbes Street, Lakeport, CA 95453.

    6/07
    ____________________

    THE CLEARLAKE VOLCANIC FIELD:


    http://vulcan.wr.usgs.gov/Volcanoes/California/ClearLake/description_clear_lake.html


    Last edited by HigherLove on Sun Mar 20, 2011 11:49 pm; edited 1 time in total
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    MargueriteBee

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    Re: Pacific Gas & Electric (PG&E)

    Post  MargueriteBee on Sun Mar 20, 2011 11:48 pm

    Opaque is right. I drove by it a couple times when I lived in Sacramento.
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    HigherLove

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    Re: Pacific Gas & Electric (PG&E)

    Post  HigherLove on Mon Mar 21, 2011 12:05 am

    Aw shucks folks I ain't speechless...

    I love oxymorons.

    "Coffee Talk with Lind Richmond" skit w/Mike Meyers.

    "I'll give you a topic: the Progressive Era was neither progressive, nor an era. Discuss".

    One of my personal favorites was during the short time I lived in Chicago and commuted to the suburbs. Flat, flat, flat.

    After that, it got even more flat.

    In going through the directory, I opted to post an e-mail, which I sent out as a blast, and listened to the little giggles from each cubicle: The Valley Mountain hospital sits neither in a valley, nor on a mountain. Discuss.
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    HigherLove

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    Re: Pacific Gas & Electric (PG&E)

    Post  HigherLove on Mon Mar 21, 2011 12:18 am

    To the North of my volcanic field and visible during 3/5 days of my commute (on a clear day), the appropriately named "Snow Mountain", in the Mendocino National Forest. I went camping here when I was a kid (I made the rounds of vacation bible schools in the summer). :op

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    HigherLove

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    Re: Pacific Gas & Electric (PG&E)

    Post  HigherLove on Mon Mar 21, 2011 12:37 am

    Carol wrote: Insanely Happy

    I'm kind of thinking I would like the transfigured type of body. Just remember, if you cross sooner then later head for Sag A and the blue white light for your full DNA upgrade! Oooyeah 1

    Does it come with fries?

    G'night. :op
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    HigherLove

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    Re: Pacific Gas & Electric (PG&E)

    Post  HigherLove on Mon Mar 21, 2011 1:01 am

    Ooooh...A Yosemite pic from my mid-20s. lol

    A coyote stole my lunch after I set it down to get a pic. Doggone thing carried the folded, brown bag off like it was going to school.

    But, this is to remind me of the tragedy of Hetch Hetchy, and hydroelectric power.

    From Glacier Point, w/ Yosemite Falls in the lower background.
    I climbed over the rail that said "do not go past this rail".

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    HigherLove

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    Re: Pacific Gas & Electric (PG&E)

    Post  HigherLove on Mon Mar 21, 2011 1:16 am

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hetch_Hetchy_Valley


    RESTORE HETCH HETCHY

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    http://www.hetchhetchy.org/


    Situated inside Yosemite National Park, the Hetch Hetchy Valley was described by John Muir as “one of nature’s rarest and most precious mountain temples.” The pristine Tuolumne River flowed along the valley floor, surrounded by flowered meadows and ancient forests which teemed with bears and bobcats, rushes and eagles. Indeed, Hetch Hetchy Valley was considered one of the most unique and diverse ecosystems in the world.

    Initially protected by the establishment of Yosemite National Park, in 1913 the city of San Francisco won congressional approval to build the O’Shaughnessy Dam which buried this extraordinary wilderness valley under 300 feet of water. Although John Muir was unsuccessful in preventing this from happening, his rigorous campaign resulted in the creation of an international environmental conservation movement.

    Modern engineering advances afford us the opportunity to remove the reservoir and create one of the most ambitious and exciting environmental restoration projects in human history. As a living laboratory, Hetch Hetchy will advance the science of restoration by providing biologists, ecologists and botanists from all over the world with the chance to apply cutting-edge science to re-establishing lost habitats.

    Learn more about how you can help us restore Hetch Hetchy today!

      Current date/time is Wed Jan 16, 2019 1:55 am